Terribleminds writing advice cassandra

Basically, he believes it's more cinematic and urgent than past tense. I don't agree with his reasoning, but I also haven't read his work beyond what's contained in this thread, so I can't really comment. Though Wendig has been around way longer than Andrew Hussie's writing, his style reminds me of MSPA comics and the fanfic surrounding it, which was all present tense in the former, and more often than not in present tense for the latter.

Terribleminds writing advice cassandra

CW: I like to think it serves a greater educational purpose for all those folks who cry foul about writing advice and how it's all bullshit and nonsense and urinal cakes. I receive weekly emails from other writers who say that the material on Terribleminds has helped them. And in some cases these are published authors, or soon-to-be-published. THANKYOUTHANKYOUTHANKYOU! Wonderful words, Cassandra. And the examples you chose are perfect. I despair of genre writing advice that denies beautiful writing–usually in favor of plot, as though there can’t be both? My best books are those in which I allowed my voice thorough freedom. The Ramble 64 comments advice, writing. How Chuck Wendig Edits A Novel. terribleminds. January 8, Recently, I wrote a post called, “How Chuck Wendig Writes A Novel.” Just after writing that, I threw myself into the churning gears of editing and rewriting not one novel, but three — I spoke a little on Twitter about said editing.

Wendig is a rare combination of an author who excels not only at writing a compelling narrative, but is adept at the business and marketing side of writing. And lets face it, with the nature of the Internet, it is—and I was thrilled to get the chance to interview him.

What's your latest novel, Blackbirds, about, and where did you come up with the idea? One might think this is empowering, as she could step in and avert the Grim Reaper's dread hand, but it ain't that easy.

In fact, Miriam can't seem to change a damn thing.

Chuck Wendig / Charles Wendig / TerribleMinds | Page 13 | Kiwi Farms

And so, at the start of the book, she's something of a vulture -- waiting for people to die, placing herself at the scene, and robbing from them like a true-blue scavenger. But on the road she meets a trucker and bears witness to his death in her vision -- and the vision suggests she is complicit in his demise.

Which leads her on a path that asks whether she'll try once again to thwart fate or whether she'll do as she's always done: The book comes out of a place where I was transitioning from a young brash adult with no sense of death to a not-so-young dude where people were dying all around me and it was suddenly made clear that, oops, one day I was going to take the big damn dirt-nap, too.

The imagery in Blackbirds is some of the most disturbing I've read in a while, particularly the dream sequences. Was there any point in writing Blackbirds where you censored yourself or were there scenes that you ended up cutting because you felt they were too graphic?

terribleminds writing advice cassandra

Anything that got cut was to tighten the story or focus the characters. But all the awful gnarly bits got to stay if they were appropriate ingredients. And I definitely didn't censor myself! Gods, could you imagine if this book was a result of me censoring myself? What would the uncensored book look like?

I shudder to think. If by some weird chance you met a person such as Miriam Black, would you want to know how you kick the bucket? Also, do you plan on keeping the blog going after the release of Blackbirds? I don't know if I'd want to know.

Control freak and all, be interesting to prepare. The blog will continue -- it doesn't require a lot of maintenance from me. Seems to have compelled people to check it out from time to time.

You Should Listen To People Who Know Better

Has becoming a father changed your views of life and death along with aging? It really has changed things. I used to be a rabid hypochondriac and then, when my wife got pregnant and had the baby Which was weird, and I don't quite understand it.

My body and mind are secretly like, "You have bred true, penmonkey. Go die of the bird-flu, your work here is done.

A Very Good List Of Vital Writing Advice — Do Not Ignore! – Chuck Wendig: Terribleminds

Would you ever consider writing a long-term series character, such as continuing Miriam Black's story beyond the current two book arc? And what are your feelings toward writers who spend their careers writing the same character s? Miriam is ideally a long-term series character.

That said, I don't want to write her forever, either. Her story can't just go on and on and on. Her tale has an end. I'm not sure how long it'll take to get there, but for now I know what it is.

That said, I don't begrudge writers who write one character for their entire careers. Long as that makes them and the readership happy, hey, fuck it.

Do as thou wilt shall be the whole of the law. You've written some very strong female characters in the past couple of years. Do you approach writing women differently from male characters, or are they fundamentally the same for you? That's a tricky question. On the one hand, you have to acknowledge that women have difference experiences than men—some are biological I will never give birth, for instancewhile others are sociological the current "war on women" by a bunch of rich white dudes with what I'm assuming are tiny withered penises.

You Don’t Always Have To Listen To People Who Know Better

So, you have to take that stuff into account, but at the same time a "strong female character" really just has to be a "strong character.THANKYOUTHANKYOUTHANKYOU!

Wonderful words, Cassandra. And the examples you chose are perfect. I despair of genre writing advice that denies beautiful writing–usually in favor of plot, as though there can’t be both?

My best books are those in which I allowed my voice thorough freedom. Cassandra Khaw is a London-based writer who still has her roots buried deep in Southeast Asia where there are sometimes more ghosts than people. Her work tends to revolve around intersectional cultures, mythological mash-ups, and bizarre urban architecture.

A very good list of vital writing advice – do not ignore! ROFL, especially #25 that sums it up perfectly. And if you’re wondering if you should get an [ ].

Brake and accelerate: writing advice from Chuck Wendig Posted: June 30, | Author: Cassandra Page | Filed under: On writing | Tags: Chuck Wendig, editing, pacing, writing | Leave a comment One of the things I struggle with as a writer is pacing.

My first book needed major editorial surgery—after pointy-edged feedback from various folks, . THANKYOUTHANKYOUTHANKYOU! Wonderful words, Cassandra. And the examples you chose are perfect. I despair of genre writing advice that denies beautiful writing–usually in favor of plot, as though there can’t be both?

My best books are those in which I allowed my voice thorough freedom. Writing Advice From My Dream Brain «terribleminds: chuck wendig 25 Ways To Plot, Plan and Prep Your Story «terribleminds: chuck wendig -- Love the Dialogue Pass idea!

See more. Plot a Story.

terribleminds writing advice cassandra

Stephen King writing advice info-graphic See more.

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